Covid-19 Alert

As of 18/2/21, Auckland is down to ALERT LEVEL 2 and the remainder of New Zealand is back to ALERT LEVEL 1.
Scan QR Codes & turn on Bluetooth | Save Lives | Be Kind

Saturday, February 13, 2021

Groove gets down at the Island Bay Festival

Dean and Groove FM provided the sounds at the Island Bay Festival today.  For once the weather gods smiled a sunny 23 degrees with light winds.  Several 1000 locals turned up to share the day of food, fun and entertainment, including the traditional Greek blessing of the fishing boats.  

The Island Bay Festival started in 1985 and is one of Wellington's longest-running festivals.  Showcasing the talent and diversity of the South Coast, this annual 2-day summer festival is held every February.

The festival continues tomorrow - check out what's happening here





Thursday, January 28, 2021

NZ Artists Release Open Letter To Music Industry


Last week's revelations of sexual harassment and exploitation in Aotearoa's music industry have resulted in a number of high profile sackings, including at Warner Music and CRS Management.  It has prompted a open letter calling for some much-needed significant change. 

The following, which has been published in a number of media outlets was written by Anna Coddington and signed by Bic Runga, Anika Moa, Lorde, Tami Neilson, Hollie Smith and Mel Parsons.  The letter below was originally published here.  

“Music is a powerful force, capable of moving us impressionable humans in all directions. It’s difficult, if not impossible, to make moving art without allowing yourself to be vulnerable and emotional sometimes. It is part of an artist’s job to feel deeply in all directions in order to create something worth listening to. 

People in the engine room of the music industry – studios, venues, festivals, any place where music is being made – are working in conditions where emotions may be high, hours may be long, green rooms may be small, and alcohol is often used as a social lubricant or a way to pass the time. These are the conditions of the workplace. 

To everyone working in the industry – you know the conditions. We’re all passionate about music and regularly in awe of the talent around us. But if the artist’s job is to feel deeply and be vulnerable enough to create moving music, yours must be to help them professionally and personally, without crossing boundaries and taking advantage of them. 

Right now is an opportunity to assess yourself honestly and reflect on how you conduct yourself in those environments. If you can’t work in those conditions while preserving the dignity of those around you, now is the time to either find another work environment that you can handle yourself in, or make use of the various resources and procedures being put in place by SoundCheck Aotearoa and other initiatives to educate yourself and change behaviours. This goes for everyone, industry-wide.

Men in the music industry have been operating in a safety-in-numbers scenario since forever. Young women, takatāpui, and other minorities stepping fresh into the music industry do not have that safety. Yes it’s a hard knocks career choice. Everyone needs to be ready to have their ego checked and confidence crushed, or the opposite – great success, fans at their feet, whatever. Either way artists are up for some head-messing times and need to learn to deal with that, hopefully with good support around them. What nobody should have to deal with ever – under any circumstance – is sexual harassment. 

We need better behaviour from those who hold power now, but ultimately we need more diversity in those positions of power so that the music industry as a whole can thrive and reap the benefits of different perspectives. Innovation in both business and creativity will follow – there is plenty of research to back this up. It requires active and conscious change, and the transfer of some power from the restricted group who hold it now to others who don’t look or think like them. We’ve been talking about this and failing to affect change for a very long time, but it can and must be done. 

• Learn about boundaries and consent. If you can’t operate within those boundaries don’t operate.

• Do not accept the transgression of those boundaries from anyone you work with. If you see or hear something don’t let it slide. 

• Check on people. If you suspect someone is being made to feel uncomfortable – ask them if they’re ok. 

• Do your best to be in the right, but always be ready to be wrong. If someone tells you a behaviour is not acceptable to them, no matter how small, don't get defensive – learn from it. 

• Diversify your workplace. If you need another person, actively seek candidates from different backgrounds, with different perspectives. 

• Speak to professionals who can help you achieve these goals – there are plenty. Do not rely on musicians and others in your own industry to teach you. That is unpaid labour and surprise – we aren’t psychologists or HR pros and probably don’t even have the tools you really need. 

• Don’t make public statements without taking private action.

Imagine a music industry without women, non-binary, rainbow community, differently-abled, Māori, and other ethnic minorities. Imagine if the artists demographically reflected the “industry”. No one wants that. It’s boring. You could say goodbye to most of the acts we’ve all been enjoying at festivals this summer for starters – the ones who have been helping EVERYONE in the industry recover the losses of last year. Without an interesting array of people the music suffers. Make it safe for them. Safety – it’s the very minimum every human being deserves.

The onus for change can’t sit with those of us who don’t hold that power. Everyone should want a better, safer, more productive industry. Artists are not here to help you make these changes. We don’t want to be writing open letters and talking to the media about the inappropriate behaviour of others. We want to be working on our music.”

 – Anna Coddington, Bic Runga, Anika Moa, Lorde, Tami Neilson, Hollie Smith and Mel Parsons

Groove supports this and condones sexual harassment of any kind.  We support all music workers and artists, no matter who they are.  If you are a music worker in Aotearoa and you need crisis or counselling support, the MusicHelps Wellbeing Service is available 24/7 online here, on the phone (toll free 0508MUSICHELPS) and in-person for free, fully funded by MusicHelps.

www.musichelps.org.nz/backline/wellbeing

www.soundcheckaotearoa.co.nz

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

This Just In: Dave Brubeck posthumously releases Time Outtakes

Featuring 7 never-before-heard tracks from the original 1959  'Time Out' recording sessions and 2 tunes that weren't on the original recording, this new release will have Brubeck fans buzzing.

“While researching books written to celebrate jazz legend Dave Brubeck's Centennial, a fascinating discovery was made; there were brilliant alternate takes for most of the tunes released on Time Out, the first jazz LP to sell over a million copies… These newly discovered recordings feature wonderful performances that are every bit as compelling as their famous counterparts!”
- Chris Brubeck

Includes previously unreleased takes of: 

1. Blue Rondo a la Turk
2. Strange Meadowlark

3. Take Five

4. Three To Get Ready

5. Cathy's Waltz

6. I'm In A Dancing Mood

7. Watusi Jam and 

8. Band Banter from the 1959 Recording Sessions

Read a review at All About Jazz

Saturday, January 09, 2021

Strang's Instant Coffee

Kiwis love their coffee. 
We're known for producing fantastic roasted beans. And we can  and claim we're the inventors of the Kiwi classic, the flat white. 

Wellington can claim some of the Best brews- Havana, Lafarge, People's, Mojo, etc. Taranaki has Ozone Coffee, produced at a roastery in Waiwhakaiho.

Here's Robert Harris, Bravia and a whole hose of others. And in in the 60's and 70's  Welly had the famous brand Faggs, in Cuba St. 
Coffee has been around a long t8me. Usually dominated by the big brands, especially in the instant market: Netscape, Bushels and International Roast. 

But our New Zealand has a long history of coffee related innovation in coffee drinking. David Strang, based in Invercargill, invented what could be the very first instant coffee in the world, applying for a patent for “Strang’s Patent Soluble Dry Coffee-powder” in 1890. His coffee was on the shelves in 1889, 12 years before Satori Kato is credited with inventing instant coffee in Chicago. 
Either way, Strang’s coffee was a hit in New Zealand because of its ease of preparation. It was described in the Otago Daily Times as an economical and flavoursome solution for coffee drinkers. The use of chicory powder,made from roasted and ground chicory root, to mix with the coffee may not be as appealing to today’s coffee drinkers, the Strang method of roasting doesn’t sound too dissimilar to our methods today. It was “roasted by a current of hot air which develops the flavour more thoroughly”.

SOUTHLAND TIMES, ISSUE 10201, 6 JULY 1889


Thursday, December 31, 2020

Dave Dobbyn to be knighted

The 2020 New Year's Honours list includes Musician Dave Dobbyn, Epidemeologist Professor Michael Baker and  Pofessor Juliet Gerrard, the prime minister's chief science adviser. 

Dobbyn, with a career spanning 40 years, has been knighted for his services to music. This is his official entry:
"David Joseph (Dave) Dobbyn, ONZM, for services to music. Dobbyn received a record number of music awards and Silver Scrolls for his work across nine studio albums over a 40-year career.

Dobbyn came to prominence in 1979 with Th'Dudes, who undertook a reunion tour in 2006, and in the 1980s with DD Smash, before going solo.

He performed free concerts for residents of Matata after the floods, spent time at community centres following the Christchurch earthquakes, and has an ongoing connection to the families of the Pike River Mine tragedy after writing This Love in honour of the 29 men who lost their lives. In 2017, he recorded his anthem Welcome Home - Nau Mai Ra in te reo Māori. He was inducted into the New Zealand Music Hall of Fame in 2013."

The list also includes public health academic Cynthia Kiro, businessman and former television presenter Ian Taylor, Māori academic William Temara, economist Suzanne Snively, Māori academic leader Sir Mason Durie, and social scientist Dame Mary Anne Salmond.

Tony Randerson and Lyn Stevens QCs were appointed Companions of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Randerson has chaired two government reviews into resource management in New Zealand.  Stevens headed 2016's inquiry into Havelock North's water contamination incident.

You can see the full list here:

https://dpmc.govt.nz/publications/new-year-honours-list-2020




Thursday, December 24, 2020

Merry Xmas, Groovers!

Thank you, Groovers for tuning in to us all year. And what a year it's been. Who'd thought the phrase 'turn your mic on' would ever apply outside the studio?

Anyway, we wish everyone around the country and the world a great Christmas 🎄 No matter how you celebrate it, in your bubble,  in isolation or in a crowd. 

Stay strong, Kia kaha. Blessing you all! 

Don't forget you can find us under 'tune in radio' app and online at www.groovefm.co.nz 


Wednesday, December 09, 2020

Remember Whakaari today

At 2.11pm, it will be exactly one year since Whakaari/White Island erupted.

Of the 47 people on the island at the time, 22 were killed.

Nearly all were brought home eventually, except for two who remain missing: an Australian tourist Winona Langford and a loca tour guide Hayden Marshall-Inman.

Today, at 2.11PM, we remember everyone involved and thank all the first responders and medical staff who helped. And we salute their bravery. 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru
Whakataka te hau ki te tonga
Kia mākinakina ki uta
Kia mātaratara ki tai
E hī ake ana te atakura
He tio, he huka, he hau hū
Tīhei mauri ora!





Monday, November 30, 2020

Taranaki Arts Festival Trust will not present WOMAD NZ 2021 but there may still be a reprieve!


Photo by Mckenzie Jennings-Gruar

Two conflicting messages were release today from the teams behind WOMAD 2020.   The current organisers of WOMAD New Zealand, The Taranaki Arts Festival (TAFT) said in a press release today that it had little choice but to pull out of the upcoming 2021 event.  They said the decision was 'gut wrenching' but given that it stood to lose millions of dollars and risked being declared bankrupt if Covid-19 disrupted the festival. 

In their own accompanying statement WOMAD UK, which oversees the event internationally, however said it was pushing on with plans for a New Zealand festival in March, drawing on Kiwi talent. 

For two decades sounds from around the world have rung around the Bowl of Brooklands in New Plymouth, attracting tens of thousands of people from around the country to the three-day WOMAD festival. 

The Taranaki Arts Festival Trust (TAFT) has until now held the contract to put on the event, but, sadly this wont happen next year.  At a press conference Chief executive Suzanne Porter said there had been a difference of opinion between TAFT and WOMAD UK about the risk Covid-19 posed to events in New Zealand. 

"Our government will close things down," she said, "as we've just seen recently in Auckland with just two days' notice.  We analysed what that financial risk was, modelled it right through.  We could carry that risk through until about February and in February we start going over the $2 million mark and I need to be very clear here - TAFT carries the loss, so we couldn't take that risk." 

My Baby at WOMAD 2019 - Photo Tim Gruar

Suzanne also said it would only take Auckland going into lockdown for WOMAD to fall over completely. If that occurred in the final week leading into the festival the charitable trust's exposure would have been closer to $3.5 million. "We would be committed to paying the artists. They'd be in town. We'd be committed to paying for the hotel rooms because they'd be in the hotel rooms. Our site would be set up...we wouldn't be able to honour our debts which is not the way TAFT works. We are not people who would simply not pay our debts and close up shop, it's just not kaupapa." 

Porter said the trust had looked at every avenue and even made a plea to the government for it to underwrite the event.  Howver that was not successful. 

An so, she said in the press release "that really is the essence of the decision. It has been gut-wrenching. TAFT has been here since the beginning, it took risks, it took losses for a number of years.  We were happy to take a rest year in 2021 and come back in 2022 when hopefully our borders were open at least to some countries and promote the full WOMAD experience again." 

Although TAFT has recently had to let two full-time staff go and reduce contractors' hours they were not sitting on their hands and are already planning a new international event for 2022. 

So what of WOMAD?  WOMAD UK director Chris Smith, however, thinks that New Zealand's risk to Covid is much less than the UK and the rest of the world.  "We have looked at what is happening in New Zealand and certainly we can see there are a lot of events that are still happening and selling very well and there's clearly a demand.   The situation in New Zealand is very positive regarding the pandemic and the advice we received was that there was good reason to carry on." 

Reb Fountain -WOMAD 2020 - Photo Tim Gruar

According to their press statement WOMAD UK was now working with multinational concert producer Live Nation on the New Zealand event. 

Porter told Radio New Zealand today that she believed that TAFT had lost its hosting rights indefinitely.  She suspected that Live Nation had swooped in and would call for a multi-year deal in return for carrying the festival. 

Smith, however, says WOMAD UK was open to working with TAFT again.  The press release he issued today said WOMAD New Zealand 2021 would be different and feature an almost exclusively Kiwi line-up. "There's a very rich range of artists from different cultures resident in New Zealand playing creatively and to a high standard and that's the model we've developed in Australia and we are looking to use in Spain and the UK. So we're very much moving during this difficult period to actually trying to keep the spirit of the event alive and to keep the spirit of cultural exchange alive, but mining the resources that are within the countries we are working in." 

"Not surprisingly," he continued, "the format for 2021 will be somewhat different but will present the usual diverse programme of artists with all or most of them based in New Zealand.  This is possible because of New Zealand’s richly diverse population and cultural heritage."  

New Zealand, he said, has had fantastic and enviable success in controlling the pandemic, and whilst this means it’s all but impossible for artists to attend from overseas it means a a local all Kiwi WOMAD festival could go ahead in its place - "with all the features we know and love."   "By promoting WOMAD in New Plymouth for another year, we will be able to offer employment opportunities to many of our longstanding crew and supporters in the toughest of years for our industry, and to continue to support local business with a festival that injects millions of dollars into the economy in a region we now call home." 

So, Groovers.  Watch this space!

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Wellington Jazz Festival 2020 - Review


"Finally, after months of waiting, the rescheduled Wellington Jazz Festival kicked off on Wednesday 18 November. I was lucky enough to attend three flagship events while soaking up some of the awesome vibes from the ‘Coolest Little Capital’."  

Read on https://www.ambientlightblog.com/wellington-jazz-fest-wellington-nz-2020/

Sunday, November 22, 2020

Wellington Jazz Festival

 The Wellington Jazz Festival wraps up today.  We took in some fantastic music including 4 new commissioned works from Kevin Field, Anita Schwabe, Riki Gooch and Blair Latham and the Noveltones.  There were gigs all over town but the most memorable were at St. Peters Church in Willis St. which  was converted into a magical Jazz club amongst the pews.

Over at the Opera House, Tom Scott's Avant Bowling Club rocked the show with a packed out gig.

Below are a few photographic highlights, taken by Festival photographer Stephen A'Court.


https://www.jazzfestival.nz/

Monday, November 16, 2020

BENEE and the Beths score big at the Aotearoa Music Awards

BENEE

For the second time this year, and the second year running, BENEE has cleaned up. After doing super well at the APRA awards earlier this year, she took home anothe four Tui at last night's Aotearoa Music Awards. 

Auckland alt-pop quartet The Beths  also scored big with three awards, including the much coveted 'Album of the Year' for 'Jump Rope Gazers'. Our own CoffeeBar Kid reviewed this for www.ambientlight.co.nz earlier this year and raved about it. He was right!

The Beths

Hot off a national tour and defying all the pain and frustrations Covid-19 has caused for local musicians,  BENEE scored a quinella, winning Best Solo Artist, Best Pop Artist, an International Achievement award, and Single of the Year for her smash hit ‘Superlonely’.

The Beths won deserving praise for their sophomore effort ollowing 'Jump Rope Gazers', released earlier this year scooping up a raft of accolades, including 'Album of the Year', 'Best Group', and 'Best Alternative Artist' - also for the second year in a row.

Jawsh 685

If you haven't heard of viral sensation Jawsh 685  you will now. He featured at Laneway earlier this year as the one to watch.  His track ‘Laxed – Siren Beat’ topped the charts globally and got reworked by Jason Durillo into the mega-smash 'Savage Love' charts globally. He’s the first Pasifika person, and only the third Kiwi ever get on the top of  the UK Singles Chart.
Jawsh took out 'Breakthrough Artist of the Year' and was the 'second recipient' of an 'International Achievement' award.

Mōhau, the supergroup collective (featuring some of our best;  Rob Ruha, Ria Hall, Troy Kingi, Bella Kalolo, Majic Paora, Kaaterama Pou, Ka Hao, and The Witch Doctor & Friends) received honours with two awards - Best Worship Artist and the Te Māngai Pāho Mana Reo Tui.

Winners of the 'Best Pacific Group' at the Pacific Music Awards earlier this year, hip hop duo Church & AP also took out 'Best Hip Hop Artist'.

Maimoa, who are a collective of ten young musicians, scooped the 'Best Māori Artist' gong for' Rongomaiwhiti'.

Lisa Tomlins (BV's on 'In The Air') poses with L.A.B's Roots Award

WOMAD heroes and summer festival fans L.A.B won 'Best Roots Artist'; Haz & Miloux picked up the tui for 'Best Soul/RnB Artist'; and 'City of Souls' grabbed 'Best Rock Artist'.

Here are all the Aotearoa Music Awards 2020 winners:

1. Te Pukaemi o te Tau | Album of the Year​

WINNER: The Beths - Jump Rope GazersL.A.B - L.A.B III
Nadia Reid - Out Of My Province
Reb Fountain - Reb Fountain
Six60 - Six60
Tami Neilson - Chickaboom!

2. Te Waiata Tōtahi o te Tau | Single of the Year​

WINNER: BENEE - ‘Supalonely’
Drax Project ft Six60 - ‘Catching Feelings’
Jawsh685 - ‘Savage Love’
L.A.B - ‘In The Air’
Six60 - ‘Please Don’t Go’
Troy Kingi - ‘All Your Ships Have Sailed

3. Te Roopu Toa | Best Group

WINNER: The Beths - Jump Rope Gazers 
L.A.B. - L.A.B. III
Miss June - Bad Luck Party
Six60 - Six60

4. Te Kaipuoro Takitahi Toa | Best Solo Artist​

WINNER: BENEE - Stella & SteveJessB - New Views
Nadia Reid - Out Of My Province
Reb Fountain - Reb Fountain

5. Te Kaituhura Puoro Toa o te Tau | Breakthrough Artist of the Year

WINNER: Jawsh685 CHAIIMELODOWNZ
Paige

6. Te Māngai Pāho Te Kaipuoro Māori Toa | Best Māori Artist

WINNER: Maimoa
Ria Hall
Stan Walker

7. Te Kaipuoro Arotini Toa | Best Pop Artist​

WINNER: BENEE
Paige
Six60

8. Te Kaipuoro Manohi Toa | Best Alternative Artist​

WINNER: The Beths Mermaidens
Reb Fountain

9. Te Kaipuoro Awe Toa | Best Soul/RnB Artist

WINNER: Haz & Miloux
Lepani
Stan Walker

10. Te Kaipuoro Hipihope Toa | Best Hip Hop Artist

WINNER: Church & AP choice
vaughan
Raiza Biza

11. Te Kaipuoro Taketake Toa | Best Roots Artist

WINNER: L.A.B
Lomez Brown
Ria Hall

12. Te Māngai Pāho Mana Reo Award

WINNER: MōhauMaimoaSix60

13. Te Kaipuoro Tāhiko Toa | Best Electronic Artist

WINNER: Lee Mvtthews
State of Mind
Truth

14. Te Kaipuoro Rakapioi Toa | Best Rock Artist

WINNER: City of Souls
Devilskin
Villainy

15. Te Kaipuoro Kairangi Toa | Best Worship Artist

WINNER: MōhauKane AdamsTe Rautini

16. Te Kaipuoro Inamata Toa | Best Classical Artist

WINNER: Andrew Beer & Sarah Watkins
Klara Kollektiv
Matthew Marshall

17. Te Kōwhiri o te Nuinga | People’s Choice Award

L.A.B

18. Tohu Whakareretanga | Recorded Music NZ Legacy Award

Johnny CooperMax Merritt
Peter Posa, Dinah Lee
The Chicks and Larry’s Rebels

19. Te Toa Hoko Teitei | Highest Selling Artist

Drax Project ft. Six60

20. Te Rikoata Marakerake o te Tau | NZ On Air Radio Airplay Record of the Year

Drax Project

21. Tohu Tutuki o te Ao | Recorded Music NZ International Achievement

BENEEJawsh685

Additional Tuis presented in 2019

22. Te Kaipuoro Taketake Toa | Best Folk Artist

Winner: Mel Parsons - Glass Heart
Victoria Vigenser & Lindsay Martin - The Gap
Paper Cranes - Voices

23. Te Pukaemi Toa o Te Moana Nui a Kiwa | Best Pacific Music Album

Winner: Olivia Foa’I - Candid
Church & AP - Teeth
POETIK - HAMOFIED 2 EP

24. Te Kaipuoro Tuawhenua Toa | Best Country Artist

Winner: Delaney Davidson & Barry Saunders - Word Gets Around
Katie Thompson - Bittersweet
Kendall Elise - Red Earth

25. Recorded Music NZ Te Kaipuoro Tautito Toa | Best Jazz Artist

Winner: Dixon Nacey - The Edge Of Chaos
ALCHEMY - ALCHEMYMichal Martyniuk - Resonate

26. Te Kaipuoro Waiata Tamariki Toa | Best Children’s Artist

Winner: Anika Moa - Songs For Bubbas 3
Captain Festus McBoyle
Chris Sanders